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2018-01-26 digital edition
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The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved. 


 

January 26, 2018  RSS feed
Just a Nosh

Text: T T T

Just a nosh..

Complied from JTA news service

Synagogues in Philadelphia and Boston make Super Bowl wager

They are calling it the Tzedakah Super Bowl Wager Congregation Rodeph Shalom of Philadelphia and Temple Israel of Boston are making a friendly bet on next week’s Super Bowl for charity.

The synagogue from the city of the losing team will donate 18 times the point difference in the final score to the charity of the other synagogue’s choice.

Rodeph Shalom has chosen Philly Youth Basketball, which empowers youth as students, athletes and leaders. Temple Israel has chosen the CTE Center at Boston University Medical Center, which conducts high-impact, innovative research on the long-term consequences of repetitive brain trauma in athletes and military personnel. Both synagogues also urged their congregants to donate to the charities ahead of the Super Bowl.

There are cross-city Jewish ties on each side of the upcoming game. Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeff Lurie, who grew up in Newton, MA, attended Temple Israel of Boston as a child. He is a former Patriots season ticket holder and reportedly was outbid by current Patriots owner Robert Kraft in an effort to purchase the team, WHDH Boston reported. Meanwhile, Temple Israel’s Associate Rabbi Matt Soffer is from Philadelphia and remains an Eagle’s fan. He grew up going to Congregation Rodeph Shalom.

At LA Women’s March, Natalie Portman recalls ‘sexual terrorism’ after 1st film

Actress Natalie Portman told thousands of marchers at the Women’s March Los Angeles that she experienced “sexual terrorism” at the age of 13 following the release of her first movie.

The Israeli-born actress said her first fan letter after the release of The Professional, in which she played a young girl who befriended a hit man in hopes of avenging the murder of her parents, was from a man describing his “rape fantasy” involving the young actress.

Portman, 36, said she rejected movie roles including a kissing scene, began to dress in an “elegant” style, and built a reputation as a “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious” young woman “in an attempt to feel that my body was safe and that my voice would be listened to.”

“At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me,” Portman said. “I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world that I’m someone worthy of safety and respect. The response to my expression, from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements, served to control my behavior through an environment of sexual terrorism.”

In November, Portman was named the winner of the 2018 Genesis Prize, the so-called Jewish Nobel, and said the $1 million prize will go to programs that focus on advancing women’s equality.


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